The World After Brexit Over the last few days, we’ve already spoken with numerous clients about the potential financial and regulatory impacts of the UK’s vote to leave the European Union. As the referendum’s outcome reverberates through the markets, here are a few key notes: 1) What happened in financial markets? The British pound plummeted 12% overnight from Thursday, nearly doubling its worst ever one-day percentage loss that occurred in 1992 when it came under speculative attack and fell out of the ERM – it has continued to fall sharply today. The euro also weakened substantially, while the Japanese yen strengthened considerably as the safe-haven currency of choice (the Swiss franc’s pressure to appreciate was mitigated by Swiss Central Bank activity). Bonds from the US to the UK to Germany rose sharply, anticipating expansionary monetary policy to ward off recession.…

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Hedging Lessons from Brexit On Thursday, British citizens will vote in a referendum posing this question – “Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?” The result will have sweeping implications for trade policy, the flow of immigrants, and even the continued viability of the European Union. Hence, as the referendum’s projected outcome has shifted from Remain to Leave and back again, worldwide currency, interest rate, and equity markets have swung wildly. As a global company with operations in the UK and Europe, we’ve been monitoring the referendum buildup closely. In addition to its anticipated economic and political impacts, there are also numerous valuable risk management lessons, including (1) The best time to buy insurance: The cost of seasonal hurricane insurance on an Outer Banks home skyrockets once there’s already a Category…

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VIDEO: Portfolio Reconciliation Requirements Heather Fritzinger of Chatham Financial discusses the advantages of reconciling a portfolio of derivatives transactions with bank counterparties on a periodic basis. In addition, she explains which parties are required to reconcile trade portfolios under Dodd-Frank and EMIR, and describes how this reconciliation must be properly documented according to protocols published by the International Swaps and Derivatives Association (ISDA). A full transcription of the video is available below. window._wq = window._wq || []; _wq.push({ id: 'jw6sj1p4vw', onReady: function(video) { video.bind('play', function() { Munchkin.munchkinFunction('visitWebPage', { url: '/video/jw6sj1p4vw', params: 'video=started' }) }); video.bind('end', function() { Munchkin.munchkinFunction('visitWebPage', { url: '/video/jw6sj1p4vw', params: 'video=finished' }) }); }}); Video Transcript: Heather Fritzinger: The frequency of portfolio reconciliation varies by jurisdiction, and depends on two factors; entity classification and the number of trades between the counter parties. Under Dodd-Frank, swap dealers must make…

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Dodd-Frank End-User Clearing Exception: Practical Considerations for Preparing Your Board March 12, 2013, DerivSource By Matthew E. Hoffman and Christina Norland The initial election of the end-user clearing exception represents a unique opportunity for boards to comply with Dodd-Frank and meet their fiduciary duties. Matthew E. Hoffman and Christina Norland, both of Chatham Financial explain how boards can establish a proper foundation of robust policies, processes, and procedures that will position their companies to hedge efficiently while evolving with the rapidly changing post-regulatory regime. Download Complete Article 

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EU Property Sector Commissioned Study Estimates EUR 64.9 Billion Of Impact From Proposed EU Derivatives Regulation November 23, 2010 Proposed EU rules on derivatives could take an estimated EUR 64.9 billion of working capital away from Europe’s real economy as property businesses risk being required to collateralize their interest rate hedges with cash. This is the main conclusion of a Chatham Financial study commissioned by the European property sector to assess the impact of the European Commission’s proposed European Market Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR) released on September 15, 2010. One of EMIR’s core requirements is that businesses deemed to be ‘financial’ entities must centrally clear their hedges and post cash collateral to a central clearing party. ‘Non-financial’ businesses, which use derivatives for hedging commercial risks are rightly excluded from these requirements. Absent legislative clarification, property businesses (which use interest rate hedges…

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AIFMD’s Passage and Its Implications On Derivatives Regulation November 15, 2010 After more than a year of political and legislative wrangling over the Alternative Investment Fund Managers Directive (“AIFMD”), the EU Parliament finally adopted the Directive in its plenary session last week by a vote of 513 to 92 with 3 abstentions. This brings the regulation of a broad range of funds (hedge funds, private equity, real estate, microfinance) one step closer to implementation. There remains a degree of uncertainty as ESMA – the new EU financial super-regulator, the EU Commission, and EU member states will need to work through important implementation guidelines from now until the effective date of 2013. Download Complete Article

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Summary of Key Issues from EU Derivatives Published Proposal September 21, 2010 After more than a year of incubation, the European Commission finally released a draft proposal of its derivatives legislation on September 15th, 2010. By and large, the proposal harmonizes with the U.S. Dodd-Frank bill with several notable exceptions including classification of companies into regulated and exempt entities. The EU derivative regulation works in conjunction with several other pieces of EU legislation including the AIFM, CRD, and MiFID to form a comprehensive regulatory framework. The AIFM and the derivative regulation proposed today are still subject to final approval in the EU. While the CRD and MiFID are subject to review and potential revisions to bring them in line with the G20 spirit of more regulation for the derivatives market. Although, the final shape and form of European derivative regulation…

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