Less than a month ago, mathematician Christopher McKinlay made waves when he unveiled his quantitative methodology for hacking an online matchmaking website called OkCupid to find his soul mate. Thoroughly discontented with the low yield of his online dating profile – a paltry six first dates in nine months – McKinlay decided to make a change. Instead of continuing to look for love just like any other user of the site would, he created a targeted algorithm to bring mathematical rigor to Cupid’s search mechanism. First, he created twelve fake accounts, enabling him to gather more than six million data points from 20,000 women around the country. From this mountain of information, McKinlay used a Bell Labs algorithm to create seven statistical attribute clusters based on questions and answers, then figured out which two attribute clusters (indie artists and professional…

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Less than a month ago, mathematician Christopher McKinlay made waves when he unveiled his quantitative methodology for hacking an online matchmaking website called OkCupid to find his soul mate. Thoroughly discontented with the low yield of his online dating profile – a paltry six first dates in nine months – McKinlay decided to make a change. Instead of continuing to look for love just like any other user of the site would, he created a targeted algorithm to bring mathematical rigor to Cupid’s search mechanism. First, he created twelve fake accounts, enabling him to gather more than six million data points from 20,000 women around the country. From this mountain of information, McKinlay used a Bell Labs algorithm to create seven statistical attribute clusters based on questions and answers, then figured out which two attribute clusters (indie artists and professional…

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